Tired of Passwords? Replace Them With Your Fingerprint

Sep 14, 2004
Tired of Passwords? Replace Them With Your Fingerprint

If you're like most people, you have more than a dozen passwords and user names to remember. Whether you're checking your e-mail for new messages, catching up on the news, posting to a Web discussion group, or playing games on the Web, you have to sign in all the time.

Microsoft has developed a convenient solution for replacing all those passwords with something you don't have to worry about forgetting: your fingerprint.

Have you ever sat there, staring at your screen, wondering which password you set?

Was it your dog's name?

Your birthday backwards?

Your best friend's nickname?


Wonder no more. Microsoft has developed a convenient solution for replacing all those passwords with something you don't have to worry about forgetting: your fingerprint. Integrated into some of Microsoft’s latest keyboard and mouse products and also sold separately, the Microsoft® Fingerprint Reader lets you log on to your favorite Web sites without scrambling for passwords—just touch the fingerprint reader with a registered fingerprint whenever a password or user name is required, and you're in. Just like that.


Quick setup for easy sign in and Fast User Switching

Easy-to-use software makes replacing passwords with your fingerprint a snap. First, the Registration Wizard opens and helps you register your fingerprints. Then, when you visit a site that requires a password, just touch the Fingerprint Reader with any registered finger, enter your data, and then click OK—it's the last time you need to enter that information. Now, you can browse to the Web site, and then log in with a swipe of the finger or log in with a click of the mouse via Quick Links.


If you turn on Fast User Switching in Windows XP, you can use the Fingerprint Reader to switch between user accounts without actually logging off from the computer. With a touch of a finger, you can quickly switch between users without closing programs and files—and each user's personal content stays personal.


The Fingerprint Reader should not be used for protecting sensitive data such as financial information or for accessing corporate networks. We continue to recommend that you use a strong password for these types of activities.

Source: Microsoft

Explore further: Baidu profit up 34 percent as mobile service grows

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