British docs repair bad plastic surgeries

Nov 19, 2007

More people crossing the English Channel for less expensive plastic surgery wind up having repair work done when they return, a British survey said.

Thousands of people travel to the continent annually for procedures that cost less than what is charged in Britain. But British plastic surgeons are warning patients what may seem like a good deal could be expensive to correct if the procedure goes wrong, the Telegraph reported.

A survey by the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons found more than 80 percent of its members treated patients with problems related to off-island surgery in the past year.

The survey reported four of 10 surgeons said they had seen between three and five cases in the past 12 months; 14 percent reported treating nine or more.

The survey also reported about a third of the surgeons who participated performed "much more" repair work during the past five years than previously.

"My experience with patients has shown that counseling is inadequate -- the individuals have no idea of the standards of care in the country they are visiting and no knowledge of the abilities or experience of the surgeon," said Douglas McGeorge, BAAPS president and plastic surgeon.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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