Substrate developed from sawmill shavings

Mar 07, 2006

University of Navarre scientists in Spain have developed an organic substrate from sawmill wood shavings to use for intensive crop growth in containers.

The substrate that has already been patented and marketed also has the advantage of being recyclable and more economic than other, imported ones such as peat or coconut fiber.

The researchers jointly developed the material with scientists at the Aralur company in Navarre.

When plants are grown in small containers -- as in greenhouses -- the limiting factor is the oxygen that can reach their roots; thereby, a substrate more porous than earth is needed. Normal soil encloses some 50 percent of air in its interior, while the newly developed substrate encloses 90 percent air and 10 percent solid material. That's why the substrates accelerate the growth processes of plants and provide much better results.

The product developed has the commercial name of "FIBRALUR" and is made from pine wood shavings that have been defibred by means of an industrial process. The resulting material has proved to be efficacious in growing mushrooms and other hydroponic crops and, to a lesser extent, with vegetable and forest nurseries.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Ultra high definition TVs boost LG Display profit

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A cool approach to flexible electronics

Jul 10, 2014

A nanoparticle ink that can be used for printing electronics without high-temperature annealing presents a possible profitable approach for manufacturing flexible electronics.

Harvesting energy from devices

Jul 04, 2014

If there's one thing nearly all modern technology has in common, it's heat. Whether it's your car, computer, television, or even refrigerator, they all generate large amounts of heat. And nearly all of it ...

Recommended for you

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance

55 minutes ago

Narcissism, considered by some as the "dark side of the executive personality," may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed ...

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government

59 minutes ago

When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top. When that doesn't happen, according to a new study from the University of Georgia, these "surprised losers" often ...

User comments : 0