Substrate developed from sawmill shavings

Mar 07, 2006

University of Navarre scientists in Spain have developed an organic substrate from sawmill wood shavings to use for intensive crop growth in containers.

The substrate that has already been patented and marketed also has the advantage of being recyclable and more economic than other, imported ones such as peat or coconut fiber.

The researchers jointly developed the material with scientists at the Aralur company in Navarre.

When plants are grown in small containers -- as in greenhouses -- the limiting factor is the oxygen that can reach their roots; thereby, a substrate more porous than earth is needed. Normal soil encloses some 50 percent of air in its interior, while the newly developed substrate encloses 90 percent air and 10 percent solid material. That's why the substrates accelerate the growth processes of plants and provide much better results.

The product developed has the commercial name of "FIBRALUR" and is made from pine wood shavings that have been defibred by means of an industrial process. The resulting material has proved to be efficacious in growing mushrooms and other hydroponic crops and, to a lesser extent, with vegetable and forest nurseries.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Why has Halloween infiltrated Australian culture?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

OLED experts to advance improved production techniques

Oct 08, 2014

Back in May, Steven Shankland in CNET said that, for the lighting business, "the next technology is coming: OLED (organic light-emitting diode) lighting. It replaces the small, bright dots of LEDs with sheets of light that aren't so piercingly bright." Now MIT Technolog ...

Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator

Oct 15, 2014

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report today that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically ...

Better water supply in Karst areas

Oct 13, 2014

Drinking water is scarce in the Indonesian region of Gunung Kidul. In this karst area, rainwater quickly drains away into the ground. It accumulates in an underground cave system and flows into the ocean ...

Recommended for you

Why has Halloween infiltrated Australian culture?

1 hour ago

Halloween appears to have infiltrated Australian culture, and according to a University of Adelaide researcher, the reason for its increasing popularity could run much deeper than Americanisation.

The hidden world of labor trafficking

1 hour ago

When it comes to human trafficking, we often hear about victims being kidnapped or violently taken from their homes. But what about people who are forced into labor in the U.S.?

US state reaches deal to keep dinosaur mummy

17 hours ago

North Dakota reached a $3 million deal to keep a rare fossil of a duckbilled dinosaur on display at the state's heritage center, where it will serve as a cornerstone for the facility's $51 million expansion, officials said ...

Jerusalem stone may answer Jewish revolt questions

20 hours ago

Israeli archaeologists said Tuesday they have discovered a large stone with Latin engravings that lends credence to the theory that the reason Jews revolted against Roman rule nearly 2,000 ago was because ...

Kung fu stegosaur

20 hours ago

Stegosaurs might be portrayed as lumbering plant eaters, but they were lethal fighters when necessary, according to paleontologists who have uncovered new evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat. The ...

User comments : 0