What's in a name? Initials linked to success, study shows

Nov 14, 2007

Do you like your name and initials? Most people do and, as past research has shown, sometimes we like them enough to influence other important behaviors. For example, Jack is more likely to move to Jacksonville and marry Jackie than is Philip who is more likely to move to Philadelphia and marry Phyllis. Scientists call this phenomenon the “name-letter effect” and argue that it is influential enough to encourage the pursuit of name-resembling life outcomes and partners.

However, if you like your name too much, you might be in trouble. Leif Nelson at the University of California, San Diego and colleague Joseph Simmons from Yale University, found that liking your own name sabotages success for people whose initials match negative performance labels.

In their first study, Nelson and Simmons investigated the effect of name resemblance on batters’ strikeouts. In baseball, strikeouts are recorded using the letter ‘K.’ After analyzing Major League Baseball players’ performance spanning 93 years, the researchers found that batters whose names began with ‘K’ struck out at a higher rate than the remaining batters. “Even Karl ‘Koley’ Kolseth would find a strikeout aversive, but he might find it a little less aversive than players who do not share his initials, and therefore he might avoid striking out less enthusiastically,” write the authors.

In a second study, the researchers investigated the phenomenon in academia. Letter grades are commonly used to measure students’ performance, with the letters ‘A,’ ‘B,’ ‘C’ and ‘D’ denoting different levels of performance. Nelson and Simmons reviewed 15 years of grade point averages (GPAs) for M.B.A. students graduating from a large private American university.

Students whose names began with ‘C’ or ‘D’ earned lower GPAs than students whose names began with ‘A’ or ‘B.’ Students with the initial ‘C’ or ‘D,’ presumably because of an unconscious fondness for these letters, were slightly less successful at achieving their conscious academic goals.

Interestingly, students with the initial ‘A’ or ‘B’ did not perform better than students whose initials were grade irrelevant. Therefore, having initials that match hard-to-achieve positive outcomes, like acing a test, may not necessarily cause an increase in performance. However, after analyzing law schools, the researchers found that as the quality of schools declined, so did the proportion of lawyers with name initials ‘A’ and ‘B.’

The researchers confirmed these findings in the laboratory with an anagram test. The result of the test confirmed that when people’s initials match negative performance outcomes, performance suffers. These results, appearing in the December issue of Psychological Science, provide striking evidence that unconscious wants can insidiously undermine conscious pursuits.

Source: Association for Psychological Science

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nilbud
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 14, 2007
Isn't there some way to sue those clowns for the pay they've wasted? Better still how can I get my hands on that cash, I've got a great theory about betting on the horses which needs testing out.
RavenBlade
not rated yet Nov 28, 2007
It's garbage like this that cause Psychology to be seen as a pseudoscience. They try to pass off correlation as causation and just end up embarrassing themselves in the process. My first name starts with a D and I have an "A" equivalent GPA.

There are two confounding variables here. There's a selection bias given they only sampled from a private College. Guess where most underachievers go... wherever their rich parents can buy them into. Secondly, these are M.B.A.'s. If there is any line of study more susceptible to "qualitative analysis" (read: subjective assessment) it is Business. It's more likely that the profs are grading the papers according to first letter of first name than the students themselves willingly handicapping themselves to receive those grades.

I also fail to see how your ability to decode anagrams will predict your academic success. College studies call upon other abilities than that.

Reviewers should study the effect of anagram decoding practice on writing ability compared to a control group and see if it's even an indicator of any practical use in testing academic performance.