Beef producers selling meat with E. coli

Nov 12, 2007

A loophole in U.S. regulations allows companies to sell meat that has come into contact with E. coli as long as it is cooked first.

It is against U.S. Agriculture Department rules to sell raw meat that, during processing, tested positive for the bacterium, a kind of food poisoning that can cause severe stomach cramps, kidney failure or even death, the Chicago Tribune reported Sunday.

But the same meat can be sold in the form of pre-cooked meat such as hamburger patties and meat loaf, the Tribune said. Since E. coli cannot survive the cooking process, the USDA and meat producers say it is safe to sell to consumers, and no one has reported being sickened.

Some public health experts, however, say the loophole helps producers mask unsafe levels of the bacterium in meat-processing facilities, a possible explanation for an unexplained recent rash of E. coli cases.

Topps Meat Co. went out of business after it was forced to recall 21.7 million pounds of ground beef after E. coli was discovered in it, the newspaper said, and General Mills recalled more than 3 million pounds of pizzas made with pepperoni that tested positive for the bacterium.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: AMA examines economic impact of physicians

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers find bad bacteria reducer

Oct 03, 2013

A substance linked to mood enhancement could be a key to combating bacteria that can cause a serious foodborne illness, NDSU researchers say.

Irradiation underused to fight E. coli in foods

Jun 06, 2011

(AP) -- Zapping salad fixings with just a bit of radiation can kill dangerous E. coli and other bacteria - and food safety experts say Europe's massive outbreak shows wary consumers should give the long-approved ...

USDA approves shot for cows aimed at E. coli

Mar 13, 2009

(AP) -- A Minnesota company has won federal approval to become the first in the U.S. to market an E. coli vaccine for cattle, a new weapon against a foodborne disease that can cause serious illness in people and even death.

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

13 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

13 hours ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

14 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Suddenly health insurance is not for sale

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)— Darlene Tucker, an independent insurance broker in Scotts Hill, Tenn., says health insurers in her area aren't selling policies year-round anymore.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Finnish inventor rethinks design of the axe

(Phys.org) —Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä is the man behind the Vipukirves Leveraxe, which is a precision tool for splitting firewood. He designed the tool to make the job easier and more efficient, with ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.