Human Error Caused Ship-Bridge Collision

Nov 11, 2007 By SCOTT LINDLAW and TERENCE CHEA , Associated Press Writers
Human Error Caused Ship-Bridge Collision (AP)
An oil soaked bird is treated during evaluations at the International Bird Rescue Research Center in Cordelia, Calif., Friday, Nov. 9. 2007. Some 58,000 gallons of oil were spilled into the bay after a container ship hit a tower of the Bay Bridge in San Francisco Wednesday. (AP Photo/ Michael Macor, Pool)

(AP) -- A preliminary investigation found human error caused a cargo ship to crash into the Bay Bridge, leading to San Francisco Bay's worst oil spill in nearly two decades, the U.S. Coast Guard said Saturday as rescue teams raced to save hundreds of seabirds.



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