Kitchen toys recalled for choking hazard

Nov 06, 2007

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission announced a voluntary recall of Laugh & Learn Kitchen Toys because of a potential choking hazard.

About 155,000 units of the Fisher-Price Inc. toys were sold nationwide at retail and specialty stories for about $70 each. The recalled product includes a play kitchen with pretend refrigerator, range and sink.

The CPSC said pieces of a faucet or clock hands can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children. Officials said there were 48 reports of small parts separating from the toys, including two reports of children gagging on pieces, one report of a child who started choking and one report of a child who choked on a piece.

The Mexican-made product's item number -- L5067 -- is stamped in several locations on the toy and printed on the product's packaging above the UPC.

Consumers with questions can contact Fisher-Price at 888-812-7187 or visit the firm's Web site at www.service.mattel.com .

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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