Hartz recalls 3,600 cat vitamin bottles

Nov 05, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the voluntary recall of Hartz Vitamin Care for Cats due to the possibility of contamination.

The Hartz Mountain Corp. of Secaucus, N.J., said one specific lot involving 3,600 bottles of the cat vitamins might have been contaminated with salmonella, which can cause infections in animals, children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems.

The recalled Hartz Vitamin Care for Cats has a lot code of "SZ-1637 1," and a UPC number 32700-97701. The vitamins were manufactured by UFAC Inc. of Baconton, Ga.

Cat owners are urged to check the lot code on their bottles, and, if the code is not visible or if the bottle displays the lot code SZ- 16371, they should discontinue use of the product and discard it.

Consumers with questions can contact Hartz at 800-275-1414.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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