Guardian of genome predicts treatment outcomes for childhood cancer

Nov 05, 2007

Researchers have identified a new role for a cancer-prevention gene in the response to drug treatment for childhood cancer.

In humans, the p53 tumour suppressor gene, also known as the ‘guardian of the genome’, is known for its role in the prevention of cancer. Mutations in the gene are associated with a high incidence of cancer due to the uncontrolled division of cells which give rise to tumours.

In childhood cancers such as neuroblastoma, p53 mutations are rare at diagnosis, however they can emerge after chemotherapy.

A recent study published in the international journal Cancer Research this month by researchers from the Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research (CCIA), and collaborators in the USA, describes a new role for p53 in childhood cancer.

The group showed that by inactivating p53 in neuroblastoma cells, the most common childhood cancer, the cancer cells became resistant to a number of chemotherapy drugs.

“Our results provide definitive evidence of a role for p53 as a gene which dictates drug sensitivity in neuroblastoma,” said Dr Xue of CCIA’s Molecular Diagnostics Program.

Source: Research Australia

Explore further: Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Comet Siding Spring whizzes past Mars (Update)

12 hours ago

A comet the size of a small mountain and about as solid as a pile of talcum powder whizzed past Mars on Sunday, dazzling space enthusiasts with the once-in-a-million-years encounter.

Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants

17 hours ago

Scientists at The University of Manchester hope a major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins. The result is a culmination of 15 years of research and ...

Recommended for you

70-gene signature not cost-effective in breast cancer

Oct 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—For patients with node-negative breast cancer (NNBC), the 70-gene signature is unlikely to be cost-effective for guiding adjuvant chemotherapy decision making, according to a study published ...

User comments : 0