Ausonia Mensa remnant massif

Mar 02, 2006
Perspective view of the Ausonia Mensa massif
Perspective view of the Ausonia Mensa massif

These images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, show the Ausonia Mensa massif on Mars.

The HRSC obtained these images during orbit 506 with a ground resolution of approximately 37.6 metres per pixel. The scenes show the region of Hesperia Planum, containing the massif, at approximately 30.3° South and 97.8° East. North is to the right in these images. Ausonia Mensa is a large remnant mountain with several impact craters, rising above basaltic sheet layers. The mountain stretches over an area of about 98 kilometres by 48 kilometres and has an elevation of 3700 metres.

A large crater, approximately 7.5 kilometres in diameter and 870 metres deep, has been partially filled with sediment. The northern flank of the crater is broken by a large gully caused by erosion.

Numerous branched channels, also resulting from erosion, run along the edge of top of the plateau toward the plains at the foot of the mountain.

The western flank of the mountain is dominated by a large crater, about six kilometres in diameter, which clearly shows an ejecta blanket and secondary cratering.

Aeolian, or 'wind-created', structures are visible about 50 kilometres to south-east of the massif, indicating channeling of atmospheric flow. They are clearly visible because of their different colour.

A heavily eroded, partially filled crater of approximately six kilometres diameter is visible to the north of the massif. The crater is characterised by numerous, smaller and younger craters.

The colour scenes have been derived from the three HRSC-colour channels and the nadir channel.

The perspective views have been calculated from the digital terrain model derived from the stereo channels.

The 3D anaglyph image was calculated from the nadir and one stereo channel. Image resolution has been decreased for use on the internet.

Source: European Space Agency

Explore further: Astronomical forensics uncover planetary disks in Hubble archive

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mars name-a-crater scheme runs into trouble

Mar 11, 2014

The world's paramount astronomical authority on Tuesday slapped down a bid to hawk the names of Mars' craters, saying the Red Planet's monickers are not up for sale.

Did a Pacific Ocean meteor trigger the Ice Age?

Sep 19, 2012

(Phys.org)—When a huge meteor collided with Earth about 2.5 million years ago in the southern Pacific Ocean it not only likely generated a massive tsunami but also may have plunged the world into the Ice ...

Recommended for you

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

17 hours ago

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

20 hours ago

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

20 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

First-of-its-kind NASA space-weather project

Apr 23, 2014

A NASA scientist is launching a one-to-two-year pilot project this summer that takes advantage of U.S. high-voltage power transmission lines to measure a phenomenon that has caused widespread power outages ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Habitable exoplanets are bad news for humanity

Last week, scientists announced the discovery of Kepler-186f, a planet 492 light years away in the Cygnus constellation. Kepler-186f is special because it marks the first planet almost exactly the same size as Earth ...

Professional and amateur astronomers join forces

(Phys.org) —Long before the term "citizen science" was coined, the field of astronomy has benefited from countless men and women who study the sky in their spare time. These amateur astronomers devote hours ...

Kazakh satellite to be launched into orbit

Kazakhstan's first-ever Earth observation satellite is to be fired into orbit next week from the European spaceport in Kourou in French Guiana, launch company Arianespace said.

Google+ boss leaving the company

The executive credited with bringing the Google+ social network to life is leaving the Internet colossus after playing a key role there for nearly eight years.