Scientists: Humans causing climate changes

Mar 01, 2006

World scientists are expected to soon say greenhouse gas emissions from humankind is the only explanation for ongoing major changes on Earth.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change previously said greenhouse gases were "probably" to blame.

But, in a report expected to be sent to world governments next month, the scientists say rising concentrations of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, must be the cause of simultaneous freak patterns in sea ice, glaciers, droughts, floods, ecosystems, ocean acidification and wildlife migrations, the BBC said Wednesday.

One unidentified scientist told the BBC: "The measurements from the natural world on all parts of the globe have been anomalous over the past decade. If a few were out of kilter we wouldn't be too worried because the Earth changes naturally. But the fact that they are virtually all out of kilter makes us very concerned."

The report is expected to say there is still great uncertainty about the pace and scope of future change.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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