Group calls for ban on dolphin therapy

Oct 28, 2007

A British conservation group wants a ban on dolphin-assisted therapy, arguing there is no proof it helps the sick and disabled.

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society said that the therapy -- swimming with wild or captive dolphins -- involves "two highly vulnerable groups." In a report, the society cites studies that show the therapy can be dangerous.

"This is due to the fact that dolphins are wild animals and are unpredictable and that people have been injured swimming with dolphins, sometimes seriously," the group said in a statement. "Disease transmission is also a concern."

Dolphins have infected humans with brucellosis, while they have sometimes been infected with chickenpox after close contact with people.

As the therapy becomes more popular, dolphins are being taken into captivity to serve as therapy animals, the society said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Were clinical trial practices in East Germany questionable?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'

1 hour ago

Adherent cells, the kind that form the architecture of all multi-cellular organisms, are mechanically engineered with precise forces that allow them to move around and stick to things. Proteins called integrin ...

Cat dentals fill you with dread?

1 hour ago

A survey published this year found that over 50% of final year veterinary students in the UK do not feel confident either in discussing orodental problems with clients or in performing a detailed examination of the oral cavity ...

Recommended for you

Were clinical trial practices in East Germany questionable?

17 hours ago

Clinical trials carried out in the former East Germany in the second half of the 20th century were not always with the full knowledge or understanding of participants with some questionable practices taking place, according ...

Schumacher's doctor sees progress after injury

Oct 23, 2014

A French physician who treated Michael Schumacher for nearly six months after the Formula One champion struck his head in a ski accident says he is no longer in a coma and predicted a possible recovery within three years.

User comments : 0