Landfill alternative to generate energy

Oct 22, 2007

A Michigan company could become the first in the nation to generate electricity by incinerating waste, thereby reducing the need for landfills.

SunCrest Energy, based in southwest Michigan, wants to build a facility that would incinerate trash at more than 10,000 degrees, converting it to synthetic gas that would power electricity-generating turbines.

The facility would make Michigan a leader in clean energy and alleviate landfill burdens from trash imported from Canada. The plant could be operational within two-years, the Detroit Free Press reported.

While a similar plant is being proposed for Florida, the Michigan project could wind up being the first plant of its kind in the nation, said the company's president and founder, Marcello Iannuci.

"We sent a man to the moon in 1969, but we're still burying our trash in a big hole," the Free Press quoted Iannuci as saying.

City commissioners are debating over landfill expansion or reducing imported waste levels. Macomb County Commissioner Paul Gieleghem, a Democrat, said the new clean-energy facility is "an incredible benefit for future generations."

Democratic county commissioners will hold a public hearing in November to discuss the matter.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: First of four Fukushima reactors cleared of nuclear fuel

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fuel to the fire? Fuel exports soar under Obama

Dec 08, 2014

Solar panels glisten from every thatched hut on this crowded island, one of the largest in this remote chain off the Panamanian coast. But the tiny emblems of green energy offer no hope against climate change.

Study: Young people not so 'green' after all

Mar 15, 2012

They have a reputation for being environmentally minded do-gooders. But an academic analysis of surveys spanning more than 40 years has found that today's young Americans are less interested in the environment ...

Asian carp raises fear and loathing on Great Lakes

Dec 10, 2009

(AP) -- After nearly four decades as a fishing guide on the Great Lakes, Pat Chrysler has seen enough damage from invasive species to fear what giant, ravenous Asian carp could do to the nation's largest bodies of freshwater.

Recommended for you

The state of shale

Dec 19, 2014

University of Pittsburgh researchers have shared their findings from three studies related to shale gas in a recent special issue of the journal Energy Technology, edited by Götz Veser, the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor of Che ...

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

Dec 18, 2014

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

Dec 18, 2014

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.