Canadian medical journal editors are fired

Feb 22, 2006

The Canadian Medical Association has fired two of the leading editors of its peer-reviewed journal, reportedly in a dispute over editorial independence.

Dismissed were the editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Dr. John Hoey, and the publication's senior deputy editor, Anne Marie Todkill, The New York Times reported, noting the CMA issued no public announcement concerning the firings.

The president of CMA Media, Graham Morris, told the Times the firings are not connected with a dispute over an article last year detailing difficulties some Canadian women experienced in purchasing Plan B, a non-prescription morning-after birth control pill.

A large portion of the article was ordered deleted before publication following complaints from a Canadian pharmacists' association.

"Dr. Hoey was at The Journal for 10 years," Morris told The Times. "I felt it was time for a fresher approach."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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