NASA awards Juno Jupiter mission contract

Oct 04, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has picked Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services of Littleton, Colo., for the Juno mission to Jupiter.

The $190 million contract includes launch services for an Atlas V model 551 rocket, payload processing, launch vehicle integration and associated tracking, data and telemetry support. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in August 2011 on an interplanetary trajectory to Jupiter.

Juno is to arrive at Jupiter in August 2016. Using remote sensing and gravity measurements, the spacecraft will characterize Jupiter's interior, atmosphere and polar magnetosphere with the primary science goal of understanding the planet's origin and evolution.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison

56 minutes ago

Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes ...

As numbers of gray seals rise, so do conflicts

13 hours ago

(AP)—Decades after gray seals were all but wiped out in New England waters, the population has rebounded so much that some frustrated residents are calling for a controlled hunt.

Recommended for you

Bacteria manipulate salt to build shelters to hibernate

5 hours ago

For the first time, Spanish researchers have detected an unknown interaction between microorganisms and salt. When Escherichia coli cells are introduced into a droplet of salt water and is left to dry, b ...

How do we terraform Venus?

5 hours ago

It might be possible to terraform Venus some day, when our technology gets good enough. The challenges for Venus are totally different than for Mars. How will we need to fix Venus?

Biomarkers of the deep

7 hours ago

Tucked away in the southwest corner of Spain is a unique geological site that has fascinated astrobiologists for decades. The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Spain's Río Tinto area is the largest known deposit ...

User comments : 0