NASA awards Juno Jupiter mission contract

Oct 04, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has picked Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services of Littleton, Colo., for the Juno mission to Jupiter.

The $190 million contract includes launch services for an Atlas V model 551 rocket, payload processing, launch vehicle integration and associated tracking, data and telemetry support. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in August 2011 on an interplanetary trajectory to Jupiter.

Juno is to arrive at Jupiter in August 2016. Using remote sensing and gravity measurements, the spacecraft will characterize Jupiter's interior, atmosphere and polar magnetosphere with the primary science goal of understanding the planet's origin and evolution.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Amazing impact crater where a triple asteroid smashed into Mars

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why we need more than one mission to Mars

Dec 05, 2014

After a 24-hour delay due to bad weather, the first test launch of the Orion spacecraft by NASA is underway with the ultimate goal of putting human beings on Mars. ...

How hostile is space?

Aug 06, 2014

Space may seem calm, but it is a more hostile environment than that on Earth. Invisible radiation is a big problem for space enthusiasts and scientific instruments. Substituting electronic devices to do human ...

How Twitter fans kept NASA alive during the US shutdown

Oct 21, 2013

Now that the US government is back in business, all "non-essential" services will resume. For 15 days we went without NASA's full operation, US Antarctic research and federally-funded clinical studies. Even ...

Recommended for you

Scientists launch CubeSats into radiation belts

19 hours ago

Twin, pintsized satellites built in part at the University of New Hampshire's Space Science Center will be launched into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at 9:20 a.m. (EST) Thursday, January ...

Cassini catches Titan naked in the solar wind

19 hours ago

(Phys.org)—Researchers studying data from NASA's Cassini mission have observed that Saturn's largest moon, Titan, behaves much like Venus, Mars or a comet when exposed to the raw power of the solar wind. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.