Driverless Truck Lurches Out of Lab

Oct 02, 2007 By DINESH RAMDE, AP Business Writer
Driverless Truck Lurches Out of Lab (AP)
Oshkosh Truck chief engineer John Beck programs a mission route into TerraMax, a military-vehicle prototype that can navigate traffic and avoid obstacles without a driver, at a test track near the company, Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2007, in Oshkosh, Wis. (AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde)

(AP) -- Sitting high in the cab of the hulking lime-green TerraMax truck, a driver can be excused for instinctively grabbing the steering wheel.



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earls
3 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2007
These things will kill everyone on the road!! All vehicles MUST have human drivers!

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