Survey: Chinese environmentally concerned

Oct 01, 2007

A new survey shows nearly seven of 10 Chinese consumers prefer to buy products and services from environmentally reputable companies.

The survey -- sponsored by the Oslo-based Tandberg Co. and conducted by the Britain-based research firm Ipsos Mori -- found only 42 percent of U.S. consumers concurred. Other countries that ranked high include Australia, 52 percent; Sweden, 48 percent; and Japan, 40 percent. Spain trailed with only 18 percent of its consumers preferring to purchase from environmentally friendly businesses.

The Tandberg-Ipsos Mori survey queried 16,823 consumers in 15 nations: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Great Britain, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden and the United States.

When asked if they were taking personal steps to reduce their carbon footprints, Canadians topped the list with 56 percent and Australians and Chinese also ranked high at 55 percent and 52 percent, in that order. U.S. residents came in seventh with 41 percent.

At the other end of the spectrum, only 17 percent of Italians and 21 percent of Russians said they were concerned about the environment and were taking personal measures to be more environmentally responsible.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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