Saltwater crocodiles find their way home

Sep 26, 2007

Australian scientists have discovered saltwater crocodiles have the ability to return to their home territory across significant distances.

Researchers from the University of Queensland, the Australia Zoo and the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service have tracked crocodiles swimming between six and 18 miles a day in such efforts.

Professor Craig Franklin of the university's School of Integrative Biology said one relocated crocodile swam around the northern tip of Australia to reach home, covering more than 250 miles in 20 days.

"We often thought crocodiles tired very quickly, but here we show very clearly that they are capable of moving long distances for days on end," Franklin said.

The results come from the first satellite tracking study of wild crocodiles undertaken by a collaboration led by Franklin, Mark Read of the park and wildlife service and late wildlife expert Steve Irwin.

The crocodiles were tracked using a specially-designed transmitter attached to the back of their heads that collected the data and relayed it via satellite to the scientists.

The study is to be reported in the online journal PLoS One.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Myanmar captures rare white elephant in western jungles

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Canada looks east-west to ship oil after Keystone veto

1 hour ago

After US President Barack Obama vetoed a bill to expedite construction of the Keystone XL pipeline Tuesday, petroleum producers are expected to turn to Canadian routes to ship oil internationally, but hurdles ...

Internet access limited in developing world

1 hour ago

Most people in the developing world do not use the Internet, with access limited by high costs, poor availability and a lack of relevant content, a Facebook report said Tuesday.

Manhattan Project physicist Ralph Nobles dies at 94

1 hour ago

(AP)—Ralph Nobles, a nuclear physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project and later led efforts to save thousands of acres of San Francisco Bay wetlands from development, died following complications of pneumonia, according ...

In Japan, robot dogs are for life - and death

1 hour ago

Incense smoke wafts through the cold air of the centuries-old Buddhist temple as a priest chants a sutra, praying for the peaceful transition of the souls of the departed.

US sees little severe weather so far in 2015

1 hour ago

(AP)—While a big chunk of the nation deals with snow and ice, the U.S. is poised to end January and February with the fewest bouts of severe weather in decades.

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.