Naming rights to fish species auctioned

Sep 23, 2007

Naming rights for 10 newly discovered species of fish were auctioned off in Monaco this week for a total of $2 million.

Proceeds from the auction benefited conservation programs in Indonesia, where the fish were discovered.

The Washington Post said Saturday the auction fetched bids from $50,000 to a high of $500,000, which went for a Hemiscyllium shark that will soon have a less formal moniker.

Conservation International Chairman Peter Seligmann said the $2 million would go to educational programs and for rangers to protect the fish habitat.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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