Nasal surgery helps transsexuals

Sep 20, 2007

British scientists say transsexuals undergoing male-to-female gender reassignment report satisfaction with surgery to create a more feminine-appearing nose.

Dr. S.A. Reza Noureai and colleagues at Charing Cross Hospital in London studied 12 patients who underwent rhinoplasty as part of their gender reassignment. The surgeons reduced the overall size of their patients' noses, and changed nasal angles to those more common in females.

Immediately after surgery, and again one year later, patients rated their satisfaction with their appearance.

"One patient was subjectively unhappy with the results of surgery and underwent revision surgery, and the remaining patients were very satisfied with the results of surgical treatment, both in the early postoperative period and at the one-year follow-up visit," the surgeons reported. "Five patients stated at the one-year visit that their nasal procedure had had one of the greatest impacts on their overall perception of themselves as female."

The study is reported in the September/October issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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