King Controls Sues KVH for Patent Infringement

Feb 17, 2006

For the second time in eight months, King Controls, a leading manufacturer of mobile satellite antenna systems for land and marine markets, has filed a patent suit against KVH Industries, Inc.

In the lawsuit, recently filed in Minnesota Federal District Court, King Controls alleges that KVH Industries has infringed on a King Controls patent (U.S. Patent No. 6,864,846) directed to methods and devices for automatically locating and tracking satellites for receiving direct broadcast satellite transmissions.

King Controls will ask the court at a March 21 hearing to issue a preliminary injunction that would stop KVH from further use, sales or marketing of the infringing TracVision® R4 and R5 satellite systems. The preliminary injunction would be in effect throughout the litigation. King Controls is also seeking permanent injunctive relief, monetary damages and attorneys' fees.

King Controls continues prosecution of its previously filed lawsuit that alleges infringement by numerous other KVH satellite systems. The suit, initiated by King Controls in May 2005, is proceeding through the discovery phase and is scheduled to be ready for trial in February 2007.

Given the presently known facts, King Controls is confident it will prevail in demonstrating infringement by KVH and expects to receive a sizable damage award from KVH for its past infringing activities.

King Controls is a privately-held company based in Bloomington, MN. It is a leading manufacturer of mobile satellite antenna systems for the land and marine markets, including King-Dome Mobile Satellite Television Systems for boats, trucks and RVs. King-Dome systems are dome-covered satellite systems that allow people to enjoy the same clear, vivid, digital pictures in mobile applications that they enjoy in their homes.

Copyright 2006 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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