Hi-tech golfwear to jump in sales

Feb 16, 2006

Hi-tech golfwear will drive golf equipment sales to $6.7 billion by 2010, according to a new market research report.

In the report "The U.S. Market for Golf Equipment," market research publisher Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, projected that the popularity of sport and golfwear particularly apparel, will continue to grow, though sales of golf clubs, balls, and bags continue to decline.

Sales for apparel, footwear, and gloves reached some $2 billion in 2005 and is expected to continue to climb to $2.4 billion by 2010, the report found.

"Golf fashion is no longer considered stale and stodgy, which is evident as the trend to accept fashionable golfwear as 'business casual' continues to drive sales upwards," said Don Montuori, the publisher of Packaged Facts.

The golfing world experienced a fall out of both core and occasional players, due to rising costs of club memberships and the industry's shift toward high-rising, high-tech clubs and balls, according to the report, but says innovative cross-selling could garner less traditional golf-goers.

"Thanks in part to the success of high profile professionals who are helping to reshape the image of golf in a positive and hip way, the appeal of golf to younger generations, women, and more diverse ethnic groups is starting to evolve," Montuori said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Daylight Saving Time does not save energy

Mar 05, 2014

With the switchover to daylight saving time just around the corner, you might wonder why we go to the trouble of springing forward and falling backward every year.

Reddit co-founder campaigns for power of Internet

Dec 05, 2013

The lanky 18-year-old in a blue mortarboard cap, his shoulders festooned with tassels and other regalia, stepped to the lectern, gave Howard High School's Class of 2001 a nervous snicker and spoke words heard in countless ...

Oracle CEO to experiment on his Hawaiian island

Oct 03, 2012

(AP)—Oracle CEO Larry Ellison envisions his recently acquired Hawaiian island becoming a "little laboratory" for experimenting with more environmentally sound ways to live.

Recommended for you

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

2 hours ago

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

Freight train industry to miss safety deadline

3 hours ago

The U.S. freight railroad industry says only one-fifth of its track will be equipped with mandatory safety technology to prevent most collisions and derailments by the deadline set by Congress.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

4 hours ago

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

5 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Microsoft CEO is driving data-culture mindset

(Phys.org) —Microsoft's future strategy: is all about leveraging data, from different sources, coming together using one cohesive Microsoft architecture. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on Tuesday, both in ...

Simplicity is key to co-operative robots

A way of making hundreds—or even thousands—of tiny robots cluster to carry out tasks without using any memory or processing power has been developed by engineers at the University of Sheffield, UK.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exasperated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.