Judge Strikes Down Part of Patriot Act

Sep 06, 2007 By LARRY NEUMEISTER, Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- A federal judge struck down parts of the revised USA Patriot Act on Thursday, saying investigators must have a court's approval before they can order Internet providers to turn over records without telling customers.



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