Cooked ham with 39-day shelf life possible

Sep 04, 2007

An Irish scientist said cooked ham might soon be given a 39-day shelf life by preserving it with a bacterium.

"Many dairy products such as cheeses and yogurts and some fermented meat products already use lactic acid producing bacteria to protect and preserve their products and we know these are acceptable to consumers in terms of taste," said Roisin Lagan of Northern Ireland's College of Agriculture, Food & Rural Enterprise. "We investigated the possibility of extending the shelf life of cooked and sliced ham by treating it with a protective culture of Lactobacillus sakei, a common lactic acid producing bacterium."

The researchers found the commercially cured and then Lactobacillus-treated meat not only had a longer shelf life, it was rated by an untrained panel of consumers as tastier, with a better texture and overall more acceptability, than conventionally treated ham.

"This means that we have found a reliable and cost effective way of developing a tasty ham product with a maximum shelf life of 39 days when stored at 4 C (39.2 degrees Fahrenheit)," said Lagan.

The research was presented Tuesday during a meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at the University of Edinburgh.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Declining catch rates in Caribbean green turtle fishery may be result of overfishing

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tastier MRE: Chemistry gives battlefield chow a gourmet flare

May 05, 2010

The portable packages of food called the Meal, Ready to Eat (MRE) that sustain military personnel in combat or field conditions without regular food facilities are getting tastier and more sophisticated thanks to innovations ...

From ham-radio to Galileo, small satellites spell success

Nov 04, 2005

Next month should see the launch of the first Galileo satellite which will be paving the way for Europe's global positioning service. The GSTB-V2A spacecraft has been built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. in the UK, a ...

Probing Question: What do astronauts eat in space?

Apr 18, 2005

Freeze-dried cubes and unpleasant powders? Try shrimp cocktail and butterscotch pudding. These are only a couple of the items now on the galactic menu thanks to NASA's Food Technology Commercial Space Center (FTCSC), located ...

Recommended for you

Chimpanzees prefer firm, stable beds

9 hours ago

Chimpanzees may select a certain type of wood, Ugandan Ironwood, over other options for its firm, stable, and resilient properties to make their bed, according to a study published April 16, 2014 in the open-access ...

For cells, internal stress leads to unique shapes

10 hours ago

From far away, the top of a leaf looks like one seamless surface; however, up close, that smooth exterior is actually made up of a patchwork of cells in a variety of shapes and sizes. Interested in how these ...

Adventurous bacteria

11 hours ago

To reproduce or to conquer the world? Surprisingly, bacteria also face this problem. Theoretical biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown how these organisms should ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. The so cal ...

Chimpanzees prefer firm, stable beds

Chimpanzees may select a certain type of wood, Ugandan Ironwood, over other options for its firm, stable, and resilient properties to make their bed, according to a study published April 16, 2014 in the open-access ...