Russian children sickened by dysentery

Sep 03, 2007

More than 200 Russian children were sickened after drinking a dairy product prepared by workers with dysentery, it was reported Monday.

Nearly half of the children were hospitalized while the rest were treated at home in the Georgiyevsk district of the Stavropol territory, Itar-Tass reported.

The children fell ill Thursday after drinking kefir prepared by dairy factory employees infected with dysentery who had not received regular medical checkups, Itar-Tass reported. Tainted kefir also poisoned 128 children and one adult in the Stavropol city of Blagodarny in mid-August, the news agency reported.

Both dairy factories have been closed and criminal investigations were under way.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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