Acoustic issue in the Siemens 65 mobile phone series solved

Sep 07, 2004
Siemens Mobile Phone

As of today, the mobile communication group of Siemens AG – Siemens mobile for short – is offering new software versions for its 65 product series (C65, CX65, M65, S65, SL65 and the operator variants) that solve the acoustic issue which could arise when playing the shutdown melody. The software versions can be downloaded at www.siemens-mobile.com/software65 . This enables users to update their 65 series mobile phones themselves. In addition, the affected mobile phones can also be updated free of charge via Siemens Customer Service, local Siemens Service Centers and selected retailers and network operators.

For Thorsten Heins, head of Mobile Phones at Siemens mobile, one thing is clear: "We deeply regret the uncertainty this has caused among our customers. However, we did not only communicate the issue promptly and openly, but also put every effort into solving the issue in the 65 product series. As of today we are now able to offer a comprehensive solution with the new software versions. And we remain convinced of the success of our products."

Background
Siemens is one of the few mobile telephone manufacturers to offer simple and proven software updating for its phones by end users themselves. The self-update was launched for the 45 product series and had been further developed in response to the widespread demand. In addition to the classic update options (retailers, Siemens Service Centers and Hotline) end users can also update their telephones by downloading new software releases at www.siemens-mobile.com/software65 and so quickly benefit from the improvements in the software.

For the future Siemens is planning to make upgrading device software completely automatic via mobile network operators. Instead of replacing the entire device software, small components will be updated automatically as and when required. For example, this could involve the software module for the integrated camera, the MMS functionality or the various interfaces, such as Infrared or Bluetooth.

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