Shigella bacteria found in baby carrots

Aug 24, 2007

A California company is recalling bags of baby carrots because they may be contaminated with the bacteria Shigella.

Los Angeles Salad Company said the recall involves packages labeled "Genuine Sweet Baby Carrots" with a sell by date up date up to and including August 16, 2007.

The carrots were sold under the Los Angeles Salad Company label in Colorado, California, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, South Carolina and Florida. They were also sold under the Trader Joe's label in Arizona, California, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon and Washington with a sell by date code up to and including August 8, 2007, the company said Friday in a release.

Shigella bacteria can cause bloody diarrhea, fever, nausea and vomiting. The infection can be passed from person to person.

The recall was initiated after four people in Canada became ill from eating the same produce. The company said it is still trying to determine the cause of the contamination.

Consumers should return the recalled products to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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