Australian jellyfish range grows larger

Aug 20, 2007

U.S. marine scientists have discovered the range of the Australian spotted jellyfish (Phylllorhiza punctata) now extends from Texas to North Carolina.

The invasive Australian jellyfish, first reported in the Gulf of Mexico in 2000, is now reported in waters stretching from southwestern Louisiana to Morehead City, N.C., said Monty Graham, senior marine scientist at Alabama's Dauphin Island Sea Laboratory.

Ranging in size from a softball to a basketball and weighing as much as 25 pounds, the jellyfish present little to no danger in terms of their sting, said Graham. But he said they can pose a threat to commercial fishing and shrimping since they foul trawling nets and consume eggs and larvae of important fishery species.

"We absolutely depend on the public's reporting the appearance of these creatures," Graham said. "We don't have the resources to survey the waters continuously."

Beachgoers and boaters are urged to report sightings of the jellyfish to the sea lab at
dockwatch.disl.org.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Ivory mafia: how criminal gangs are killing Africa's elephants

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Standalone wireless info display device an easy fit

34 minutes ago

A Latvian team has come up with a good-looking WiFi display device, connecting to the Internet using WiFi, which runs on a high-capacity built-in battery and tracks what's important to you. This is a standalone ...

Technology improves avalanche gear for backcountry skiers

2 hours ago

As outdoor recreation companies increasingly cater to skiers and snowboarders who like to venture beyond the groomed slopes at ski resorts and tackle backcountry terrain, they've put a special emphasis on gear and equipment ...

The elephant poaching business in numbers

2 hours ago

From the pittance paid to local poachers to a multi-billion dollar industry, here are some of the key numbers related to Africa's endangered elephants:

UN moves toward major treaty for ocean biodiversity

2 hours ago

UN member states agreed Saturday to begin negotiations on a treaty to protect marine biodiversity in ocean areas extending beyond territorial waters, in a move heralded by environmental organizations.

Recommended for you

The elephant poaching business in numbers

2 hours ago

From the pittance paid to local poachers to a multi-billion dollar industry, here are some of the key numbers related to Africa's endangered elephants:

Kalbarri abalone gets helping hand

Jan 23, 2015

Department of Fisheries staff and Kalbarri fishermen have released 24,000 Roe's abalone (Haliotis roei) onto reef platforms along the cliffs north of Kalbarri, to restock a population decimated by the marine ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.