Researchers identify brain network that may help prevent or slow Alzheimer's

Aug 20, 2007
Researchers identify brain network that may help prevent or slow Alzheimer's
These highlighted spots of activity represent a brain network. Credit: Columbia University

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have identified a brain network within the frontal lobe that is associated with cognitive reserve, the process that allows individuals to maintain function despite brain function decline due to aging or Alzheimer’s disease. This finding may provide a hint about how higher levels of cognitive reserve – which is believed to build by regularly engaging in mentally-stimulating activities such as taking classes, gardening and volunteering, provides protection against Alzheimer’s disease or dementia by “exercising” the brain.

The study was led by principal investigator Yaakov Stern, Ph.D., a professor at the Taub Institute for the Research on Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain and director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Division of the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center at Columbia University Medical Center. It is published in the current issue of Cerebral Cortex.

To obtain the data evaluated in the study, participants, categorized as young (between 18-30 years of age) and elderly (between 65-80 years of age), were given one of two different memory tasks – one involving a series of letters and a second involving a series of nonsensical shapes, to complete while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The tasks were designed with increasing difficulty to allow the research team to observe the participants’ brain activation as tasks got progressively harder. This activation is known to correlate with IQ level and educational background, which Dr. Stern and his team have determined to be measures of cognitive reserve, with higher levels corresponding with higher levels of cognitive reserve.

Findings demonstrated that participants with higher levels of cognitive reserve were able to activate this network in the brain while working on more difficult tasks, while participants with lower levels of reserve were not able to tap into this particular network.

“With the identification of this brain network – located within the frontal lobe – that is active during the performance both of these verbal and spatial tasks and probably other types of tasks as well, we believe we have accomplished an important first step towards improving our understanding of how cognitive reserve is expressed within the brain,” said Dr. Stern, who is a professor of clinical neuropsychology in the Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Psychology at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Dr. Stern’s hope is that with this new understanding, he and other experts can continue working towards developing interventions to increase cognitive reserve and prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease or other age-related memory conditions.

“Interestingly, the network was found more often in younger participants, signifying that the network may degrade during the natural aging process,” said Dr. Stern. “If this degradation process can be slowed or halted, it may benefit the millions of people living with devastating memory decline.”

Source: Columbia University

Explore further: Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Formal education lessens the impact of Alzheimer's disease

Aug 11, 2009

Researchers at the Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, investigated the effects of formal education on the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. They were able to show that ...

Of minds and machines

May 10, 2011

In the 1950s and '60s -- when MIT’s Warren McCulloch and Walter Pitts were building networks of artificial neurons, John McCarthy and Marvin Minsky were helping to create the discipline of artificial intelligence and ...

Recommended for you

Another US health worker infected with Ebola

14 minutes ago

A third American health worker has tested positive for the Ebola virus while working with patients in West Africa, the Christian missionary group SIM said Tuesday.

UN implores all countries to help on Ebola

2 hours ago

The international group Doctor Without Borders warned Tuesday that the world is 'losing the battle' against Ebola, while U.N. officials implored all countries to quickly step up their response by contributing health experts ...

Travel restrictions could worsen Ebola crisis: experts

6 hours ago

Travel restrictions could worsen West Africa's Ebola epidemic, limiting medical and food supplies and keeping out much-needed doctors, virologists said Tuesday as the disease continued its deadly spread.

World 'losing battle' to contain Ebola: MSF (Update)

7 hours ago

International medical agency Medecins sans Frontieres said Tuesday the world was "losing the battle" to contain Ebola as the United Nations warned of severe food shortages in the hardest-hit countries.

Mutating Ebola viruses not as scary as evolving ones

7 hours ago

My social media accounts today are cluttered with stories about "mutating" Ebola viruses. The usually excellent ScienceAlert, for example, rather breathlessly informs us "The Ebola virus is mutating faster in humans than in animal hosts ...

User comments : 0