New cause of Tamoxifen resistance is found

Aug 13, 2007

U.S. scientists have discovered a new mechanism for resistance to Tamoxifen and Faslodex endocrine or anti-hormonal breast cancer therapies.

The researchers at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at the Georgetown University Medical Center said their findings might allow oncologists to screen women for responsiveness to such treatments, and provide clues to reversing resistance.

The research, led by Professor Robert Clarke, indicates a gene -- X-box binding protein-1, or XBP1 -- previously thought to be unrelated to breast cancer might be responsible for some resistance to endocrine therapy.

The researchers said the gene is an alternatively spliced transcription factor that participates in a stress-signaling pathway to protect cells from damage. Clarke and his colleagues determined over-expression of the spliced variant of the gene in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells led to reduced sensitivity to Tamoxifen and Faslodex.

The study was published online in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Opdivo approval expanded to include lung cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why your laptop battery won't kill you

2 hours ago

News on Tuesday that major U.S. airlines are no longer going to ship powerful lithium-ion batteries might lead some to fret about the safety of their personal electronic devices.

Visa, MasterCard moving into mobile pay in Africa

2 hours ago

Americans may just be getting used to mobile pay, but consumers in many African countries have been paying with their phones for years. Now payment processors Visa and MasterCard want to get a slice of that market, and are ...

Lightning plus volcanic ash make glass

2 hours ago

In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcan ...

Recommended for you

Opdivo approval expanded to include lung cancer

12 hours ago

(HealthDay)—U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of Opdivo (nivolumab) has been expanded to include advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the agency said Wednesday in a news release.

First-of-its kind reference on pelvic malignancies

13 hours ago

Loyola University Medical Center radiation oncologist William Small, Jr., MD, FACRO, FACR, FASTRO, is co-editor of Pelvic Malignancy and its Consequences, the first-of-its kind stand-alone reference on the subject.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.