Sea turtles make comeback on Texas coast

Aug 12, 2007

Turtle patrols on the beaches around Galveston, Texas, are tracking what appears to be a comeback of the Kemp's ridley sea turtle.

Fifteen turtle nests have been found this year on the upper Gulf Coast of Texas, seven of them on Galveston Island, The Houston Chronicle reported. Most of the finds on the island were made by the turtle patrol.

Ten nests were discovered last year.

The patrol consists of college students and other volunteers who walk the beaches looking for turtle tracks that may lead to nests. Once the nests are found the eggs are removed and taken to a hatchery.

Like other sea turtles, the Kemp's ridley deposits its eggs in a nest on a beach. The hatchlings, if left in place, are on their own from the moment they emerge from the egg, and most quickly fall victim to predators.

Andre Landry -- director of the Sea Turtle and Fisheries Ecology Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University -- said about half the nesting turtles on the upper Gulf coast began life in the "Head Start" program, which cared for hatchlings from Mexico on Galveston Island.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Salish Sea seagull populations halved since 1980s

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Huge spring tides draw crowds to French Atlantic coast

17 hours ago

France kicked off nearly a month of exceptionally large spring tides Saturday, as tourists flocked to coastal areas to witness spectacularly high water levels ahead of the so-called "tide of the century" ...

Water in Oregon pipeline is tapped for electricity

19 hours ago

Lucid Energy has developed a renewable energy system that makes use of water moving through pipelines. The company's LucidPipe Power System converts pressure in water pipelines into electricity. They have ...

Arctic oil drillers face tighter US rules to stop spills

21 hours ago

Royal Dutch Shell Plc and any oil drilling company that prospects in the Arctic Ocean must boost safety practices to prevent spills in the frigid and often hostile waters or mitigate the impact, U.S. regulators proposed Friday.

Recommended for you

A molecular compass for bird navigation

14 hours ago

Each year, the Arctic Tern travels over 40,000 miles, migrating nearly from pole to pole and back again. Other birds make similar (though shorter) journeys in search of warmer climes. How do these birds manage ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.