NASA seeks space, launch logistics help

Aug 08, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is soliciting ideas to help shape its logistics services for the International Space Station.

The space agency Tuesday issued a formal "Request for Information" seeking assistance in planning for safe, cost effective and reliable logistics services for the space station, as well as other payload launch services.

NASA said the input will be used to help structure future commercial contracts, as well as the second phase of the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services initiative to acquire commercial cargo services for the station after the space shuttle's retirement in 2010.

Responders are asked to provide information and feedback, including a description of the service provider's current and planned capability, comment on existing NASA policies on certification and oversight of launch vehicles, and suggestions as to what improvements NASA can make in commercial transportation services contract structures that would provide incentives.

The entire Request for Information is available at
prod.nais.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/eps/synopsis.cgi?acqid=126269.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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