$15M allocated to AIDS vaccine research

Aug 02, 2007

A U.S. scientist who co-discovered the virus that causes AIDS will use a $15 million grant to develop a potential vaccine.

Dr. Robert Gallo of the University of Maryland said at a news conference that he will use the five-year grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to test a vaccine that could potentially eliminate the virus in already infected cells, The Washington Times said Wednesday.

The vaccine has been tested successfully on monkeys.

The grant is part of the Gates Foundation's Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery, which started last year with $287 million in grants.

Gallo has a public-private partnership with Wyeth Pharmaceuticals and Profectus BioSciences, a spinoff of the university's Institute of Human Virology, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Animal study provides first evidence that gel can prevent multiple virus transmission in vagina/rectum

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The science of collaboration

Aug 28, 2013

It's a long, expensive, risky road to turn a scientific breakthrough into a treatment that can help patients. Fewer organizations are trying to tackle the challenges alone, says a new paper from MIT researchers published ...

Recommended for you

HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine

Apr 16, 2014

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. The study's findings ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.