Analysis: NASA Culture Still Broken?

Jul 28, 2007 By MARCIA DUNN, AP Aerospace Writer
Analysis: NASA Culture Still Broken? (AP)
This photo provided by NASA shows Deputy NASA Administrator Shana Dale as she speaks during a news conference, Friday, July 27, 2007, at NASA headquarters in Washington, Friday, July 27, 2007, regarding a report that NASA let astronauts fly drunk on at least two occasions. (AP Photo/NASA, Bill Ingalls)

(AP) -- At NASA, once again, the problem is its culture - a habit of dismissing the concerns of knowledgeable underlings.



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