Microsoft adds $25.2M to tech-center plan

Feb 01, 2006

Microsoft's Bill Gates said Wednesday his company will provide an additional $25.2 million to help build community technology centers.

That brings the total amount that the software giant will bring to the initiative to $152 million.

The additional money will be used to support 126 non-profit organizations that are opening or expanding technology centers in 64 countries. About 36,000 centers with 15 million users worldwide will be benefiting from the centers.

In a speech to announce the initiative, Microsoft's chief executive said that "access to training and technology skills is a key success factor in creating employment opportunities in underserved communities. ... Europe's unemployed are a major concern of governments we are working with, and our Unlimited Potential grants are supporting innovative partnerships that bring new skills to those who need them."

Gates delivered the keynote address at the Microsoft government leaders forum held in Portugal.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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