Stem cell specialists face questioning

Jul 16, 2007

A top panel of experts will face questions of public and scientific concern on stem cell research during an international conference being held at The University of Manchester this week.

The Stem Cell Question Time will be headed by Lord Naren Patel, chair of the UK National Stem Cell Network, as part of Stem Cell Manchester, a three-day gathering of stem cell researchers from across the globe.

Among the panellists at Wednesday’s event will be Ron McKay from the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA, Justine Burley, from the University of Singapore, and Jed Davies, from the University of Toronto, Canada.

The audience, which will be comprised of scientists both within and outside the field, will be invited to submit questions on important, contentious and challenging issues facing the stem cell research community.

Such topics up for discussion are likely to focus on the ethical issues surrounding stem cell research as well as the scientific challenges that must be overcome if this cutting-edge branch of biomedical research is to fulfil its true potential.

Also on the panel are Alan Coleman, from Embryonic Stem Cell International, Singapore, Chris Mason, from University College, London, and Daniel Brison, Co-director of the Northwest Embryonic Stem Cell Research Centre based at St Mary’s Hospital and The University of Manchester.

“The Stem Cell Manchester conference has attracted leading figures in stem cell research from across the world,” said organiser Professor Tim Hardingham, who is based in Manchester’s Faculty of Life Sciences.

“We have a packed programme of speakers lined up over the next few days culminating with the Question Time event on Wednesday where people outside the field can take part in a full and frank debate of the issues surrounding stem cell research.”

Among the speakers at the conference is Shinya Yamanaka, whose team at Kyoto University in Japan is pioneering ways of producing stem cells from adult human cells and therefore avoiding the need for embryos.

Source: University of Manchester

Explore further: Radiologist recommendations for chest CT have high clinical yield

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Key decisions on drones likely from Congress

20 hours ago

The Obama administration is on the verge of proposing long-awaited rules for commercial drone operations in U.S. skies, but key decisions on how much access to grant drones are likely to come from Congress ...

Asteroids: Breaking up is hard to do

2 hours ago

(Phys.org)—Hundreds of thousands of asteroids are known to orbit our Sun at distances ranging from near the Earth to beyond Saturn. The most widely known collection of asteroids, the "main belt," contains ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.