Cosmetic eye enhancer leads to disfigurement when not injected deeply

Jul 13, 2007

According to a new study in Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, polylactic acid (PLA), used as a cosmetic enhancement to decrease volume loss around the eyes, leads to disfigurement when not injected properly. The authors reviewed four cases where patients were injected superficially; all four exhibited nodule development and inflammation.

“PLA should not be injected superficially, especially around the eyes,” says study author and dermatologist Greg Goodman. “This material does not act as a dermal filler, which would be injected superficially to smooth wrinkles, but needs to be placed deeply below the muscles to be a safer and more effective agent.” The technique is still so comparatively new and unproven, however, that Goodman cautions against its use around the eyes unless completed by a doctor who is experienced in its use.

According to Goodman, many cosmetic techniques are implemented too quickly and too carelessly. “Practitioners should be wary of new procedures and instruction from representatives who themselves have been recently trained in the procedures,” says Goodman.

Goodman also cautions patients against trying the newest products on the market. “New procedures are not necessarily the best procedures; sometimes waiting for a procedure to improve and mature over many years is the best policy for those seeking safe, quality results.”

Source: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Explore further: Leading medical experts call for an end to UK postcode lottery for liver disease treatment and detection

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US northeast braces for flooding after record snow

3 minutes ago

Weather forecasters and emergency officials warned Sunday that melting snow would lead to heavy flooding in parts of the US northeast, with hundreds of thousands of people told to brace for fast-rising waters.

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —The sight of a tiny hummingbird hovering in front of a flower and then darting to another with lightning speed amazes and delights. But it also leaves watchers with a persistent question: How ...

'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials

8 hours ago

In subway stations around London, the warning to "Mind the Gap" helps commuters keep from stepping into empty space as they leave the train. When it comes to engineering single-layer atomic structures, minding ...

Recommended for you

Doctor behind 'free radical' aging theory dies

Nov 25, 2014

Dr. Denham Harman, a renowned scientist who developed the most widely accepted theory on aging that's now used to study cancer, Alzheimer's disease and other illnesses, has died in Nebraska at age 98.

Mexican boy who had massive tumor recovering

Nov 25, 2014

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had pieces of a massive tumor removed and who drew international attention after U.S. officials helped him get treatment in the southwestern U.S. state of New Mexico is still recovering after ...

New medical device to make the mines safer

Nov 21, 2014

Dehydration can be a serious health issue for Australia's mining industry, but a new product to be developed with input from Flinders University's Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) is set to more effectively ...

US family gets $6.75 million in Botox case

Nov 20, 2014

A New York couple who said Botox treatment of their son's cerebral palsy left him with life-threatening complications and sued its manufacturer won a $6.75 million verdict from a federal jury on Thursday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.