Black widows invade Romanian shore

Jul 06, 2007

Hotter temperatures may have spawned an invasion of black widow spiders this summer on Romania's sea shore.

Unusually high numbers of the dangerous spiders have invaded between the cities of Agigea and Eforie, Gheorghe Mustata, a marine biology expert, told the Web site Hotnews.ro.

The first reports came from a teacher working with students near Agigea.

"Some 200 such spiders were seen around the Agigea beach," Mustata said. "The population must be alerted and informed" so people don't come into contact with the spiders.

Romania's unusually warm winter and extremely hot summer may have contributed to the spider explosion, he told Hotnews.ro.

The venom produced by black widow spiders is considered more potent than that produced by rattlesnakes but since the spiders are small, the bite isn't usually fatal to humans. However, bites by several spiders could prove more dangerous.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: How do our muscles work? Scientists reveal important new insights into muscle protein

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Senators get no clear answers on air bag safety

4 hours ago

There were apologies and long-winded explanations, but after nearly four hours of testimony about exploding Takata air bags, senators never got a clear answer to the question most people have: whether or ...

Nicaragua: Studies say canal impact to be minimal

4 hours ago

Officials said Thursday that studies have determined a $40 billion inter-oceanic canal across Nicaragua will have minimal impact on the environment and society, and construction is to begin next month.

Former Brown dean whose group won Nobel Prize dies

5 hours ago

David Greer, a doctor who co-founded a group that won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize for working to prevent nuclear war and who helped transform the medical school at Brown University, has died. He was 89.

Recommended for you

Genomes of malaria-carrying mosquitoes sequenced

8 hours ago

Nora Besansky, O'Hara Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame and a member of the University's Eck Institute for Global Health, has led an international team of scientists in sequencing ...

Bitter food but good medicine from cucumber genetics

8 hours ago

High-tech genomics and traditional Chinese medicine come together as researchers identify the genes responsible for the intense bitter taste of wild cucumbers. Taming this bitterness made cucumber, pumpkin ...

New button mushroom varieties need better protection

13 hours ago

A working group has recently been formed to work on a better protection of button mushroom varieties. It's activities are firstly directed to generate consensus among the spawn/breeding companies to consider ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.