Home glucose tests may not help

Jun 28, 2007

A British study shows patient monitoring of glucose levels may not be essential to controlling type 2 diabetes for those not taking insulin.

The study, published in the online edition of the British Medical Journal, found no conclusive evidence that home monitoring improved glucose control, Health Day said Wednesday.

Lead researcher Dr. Andrew Farmer, a lecturer in the Department of Primary Health Care at the University of Oxford, said some patient groups and doctors are in favor of having patients monitor their own blood sugar but some insurance companies discourage it because of the expense.

He said half of the patients who were given glucose monitors stopped using them before the end of the study.

Farmer said the value of home monitoring remains necessary and worthwhile for people with type 1 diabetes, and for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking insulin.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Drones help show how environmental changes affect the spread of infectious diseases

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Where Ebola battles are won

7 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Four hospitals that are home to advanced biocontainment facilities have become America's ground zero in the treatment of Ebola patients.

Depression tied to worse lumbar spine surgery outcomes

10 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Depressive symptoms are associated with poorer long-term outcome in patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The Sp ...

Ebola death toll edging to 4,900 mark: WHO

10 hours ago

The death toll in the world's worst-ever Ebola outbreak has edged closer to 4,900, while almost 10,000 people have now been infected, new figures from the World Health Organization showed Wednesday.

US to track everyone coming from Ebola nations

11 hours ago

U.S. authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees ...

User comments : 0