Public says sexuality is predetermined

Jun 28, 2007

A new poll shows 56 percent of people in the United States don't believe a person can change their sexual orientation.

The results of the latest CNN/Opinion Research Corp. survey compares to 2001 when 45 percent said orientation couldn't change. In 1998, 36 percent held that belief, CNN said Wednesday.

The margin of error is plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.

CNN said a growing number of psychologists and geneticists are working on the "nature versus nurture" question about whether people choose to be gay, or whether sexual orientation is determined by their DNA.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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