Study: Pet care industry is booming

Jun 26, 2007

The American Chemical Society said U.S. pet owners spent $18.5 million last year on veterinary care, medications and other non-food pet supplies.

And as people around the world devote more of their income to keeping pets healthy and comfortable, pharmaceutical companies are devoting more research to pet health.

Writing in the ACS journal Chemical & Engineering News, Associate Editor Rachel Petkewich reported the amount of money spent on pet care in the United States is expected to grow by more than 6 percent annually. And that, she said, is spurring global pharmaceutical companies best known for making human medicines to devote more research dollars for their animal health divisions.

Such research has yielded new medicines and vaccines to keep cats and dogs healthy. For example, Petkewich cited recently approved canine diet drugs, a drug for vomiting in dogs and a new medication for the barking and other undesirable behavior associated with separation anxiety.

But Petkewich noted people might also benefit from animal health research, with products originally developed for animals often being re-purposed for diseases in humans.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough, research shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

FIXD tells car drivers via smartphone what is wrong

8 hours ago

A key source of anxiety while driving solo, when even a bothersome back-seat driver's comments would have made you listen: the "check engine" light is on but you do not feel, smell or see anything wrong. ...

Team pioneers strategy for creating new materials

10 hours ago

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, ...

Shell files new plan to drill in Arctic

10 hours ago

Royal Dutch Shell has submitted a new plan for drilling in the Arctic offshore Alaska, more than one year after halting its program following several embarrassing mishaps.

Aging Africa

10 hours ago

In the September issue of GSA Today, Paul Bierman of the University of Vermont–Burlington and colleagues present a cosmogenic view of erosion, relief generation, and the age of faulting in southernmost Africa ...

Recommended for you

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

Aug 29, 2014

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

User comments : 0