Traffic injuries are major African problem

Jun 26, 2007

A French study has found Africa's traffic death rate is higher than in any other region of the world, yet research into improving road safety is lacking.

Africa's road traffic injury mortality rate is 28.3 per 100,000 of the population when corrected for underreporting, compared with 11 per 100,000 in Europe.

But a study by Emmanuel Lagarde of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research in Bordeaux found while many studies concerning road injury prevention have been conducted in developed nations, surveillance and research efforts must be increased in developing countries to determine how to take regional specificities into account.

The research appears in the journal PLoS Medicine.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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