Samsung Mass Producing Industry's First 1.8-inch, 64GB Solid State Drive

Jun 25, 2007
Samsung Mass Producing Industry's First 1.8-inch, 64GB Solid State Drive

Samsung Electronics announced that it has begun mass producing 1.8-inch solid state drives (SSD) at 64GB - the highest density SSD available today for mobile computing applications.

"We see sharply increasing interest in SSDs among OEMs worldwide amid a growing push to launch premium SSD-based notebooks, particularly in the ultra-mobile category," said Jim Elliott, director, flash marketing, Samsung Semiconductor, Inc.

SSDs feature far greater reliability, faster boot times and faster application start-up times than hard disk drives. SSD can also improve battery life by up to 20 percent in notebooks.

The 64GB SSD consists of 64 eight Gigabit (Gb) single-level cell flash memory chips. Use of 51nm process technology permits fabrication of much smaller components, with each chip having circuitry 1/2500th the width of a human hair.

Samsung is aggressively expanding market development efforts for its SSDs. Industry wide attention on ultra-light, ultra-slim notebook PCs with flash memory based SSDs reflects early market support for this new storage medium. In addition, Samsung has already introduced 32GB SSDs into ultra-mobile personal computers (UMPCs). SSDs also are being considered for server applications such as in advertising and for Web search engines. Other digital consumer products such as camcorders, PDAs and printers can now be equipped with SSDs ranging from 4GB to 64GB.

Samsung's mass production of 64GB SSDs makes it the largest producer of high-capacity SSDs in the world.

Rapid expansion of the 1.8-inch SSD market will spark demand for even smaller SSD formats to be used in mobile consumer electronics. The miniaturization of SSDs will give rise to new types of digital products. Over the next three years, 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch SSDs will also gain a great deal of momentum for widespread use in standard notebooks and desktop PCs, respectively.

Samsung expects that sales of SSD units will increase at a rapid 270 percent pace industry-wide between now and 2010 to become the largest growth segment in the NAND flash industry.

Source: Samsung Electronics

Explore further: Don't let looks deceive: HTC One improves the camera inside

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Nanodot team aims to charge phones in less than a minute

Nov 25, 2014

The world of smartphone users, which is a very large base indeed, is ripe for better battery solutions and an Israel-based company has an attractive solution in store, in the form of nanodot batteries that ...

30C3: SD card tricks can deliver MITM attacks

Jan 01, 2014

(Phys.org) —This year's 30th Chaos Communication Congress (30C3) in Hamburg from December 27 to December 30 carried numerous informative presentations, including a reverse-engineering story about SD cards, ...

Toshiba launches two hybrid drives

Sep 25, 2012

Toshiba today announced that it will launch two 2.5-inch form factor Hybrid Drives that bring new levels of high speed read and write performance to notebook and desktop PCs. The new drives, which integrate ...

Intel sets sights on new Ultrabook SSD specs

Aug 14, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Intel reportedly plans to standardize SSD specifications for its Ultrabook platform, in line with its resolve to lead the way toward slimmer, faster laptops. Intel wants a new SSD connectivity ...

Recommended for you

IOC defends Rio legacy amid green protests

12 hours ago

Ecological protests on Saturday dogged the final day of an International Olympic Committee executive board meeting in Rio as green campaigners slated the choice of a nature reserve to hold the golf event ...

Japan's NTT to buy German data centre operator

12 hours ago

Japanese telecom giant NTT Communications is looking to acquire German data centre operator e-shelter, as it seeks to cash in on growing demand in Europe, a newspaper reported Saturday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.