Ice Age art found in Germany

Jun 21, 2007

Archeologists have found a 35,000-year-old carving of a woolly mammoth in southwestern Germany.

It is believed to be the oldest ivory carving every found, the newspaper der Spiegel said Wednesday.

An archeology team from the University of Tubingen found the figurine in the Swabian Jura, a 722-foot-long plateau in the state of Baden-Wurttemberg.

Five mammoth-ivory figurines from the Ice Age have been found at Vogelherd Cave in southwestern Germany. The new finds include well-preserved remains of a lion figurine, fragments of a mammoth figurine and two unidentified representations.

Radiocarbon dating indicates the figurines belong to the Aurignacian culture, which is associated with the arrival of the first modern humans in Europe.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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