Norwegian scientist admits more cheating

Jan 23, 2006

A Norwegian researcher who started a scandal by admitting fabricating an article in the medical journal The Lancet has admitted additional cheating.

Dr. Jon Sudbo admitted fabricating articles in two other journals. All three articles concerned cancers of the mouth.

Sudbo's lawyer, Erling Lyngtveit, told Aftenposten his client regrets the medical bluff he maintained for several years and will cooperate with investigations concerning he and his employer, the national cancer hospital in Oslo.

Sudbo's fabrication of medical research also shocked researchers in the United States, where Sudbo worked with some of the world's top cancer scientists. Several of them had been listed as co-authors of the articles Sudbo admits fabricating.

The other articles Sudbo admits were phony were published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 2004 and in the Journal of Clinical Oncology last March. He admits fabricating fatality statistics in the first article and cheating on blood test data in the second article, Aftenposten reported.

Lyngtveit said none of the fraudulent articles has had consequences for patients and all other data and studies Sudbo presented are genuine.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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