Studies identify more effective treatment for malaria control during pregnancy in Africa

Jun 20, 2007

A review of previous studies indicates that two doses of a malaria preventive therapy during pregnancy provides substantial benefit to HIV-negative women in Africa, with more frequent dosing apparently necessary for HIV-positive women, according to an article in the June 20 issue of JAMA.

In malaria-endemic regions, the burden of disease is primarily in young children and pregnant women. Women are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of malaria during their first and second pregnancies, according to background information in the article. Approximately 50 million women living in malaria-endemic areas become pregnant each year, half in areas of sub-Saharan Africa with stable Plasmodium falciparum (a parasite that causes malaria) transmission. In these regions, strategies to control malaria during pregnancy rely on case management of malaria illness and anemia, and a variety of preventive measures that consists of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and intermittent preventive therapy (IPT) with the malaria drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine.

Feiko ter Kuile, M.D., Ph.D., of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, England and colleagues evaluated data to assess whether increasing the frequency of IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy could provide a temporary respite in areas in Africa with increasing sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance.

The researchers identified four trials that compared 2-dose IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to case management or placebo in women during their first or second pregnancy. The IPT reduced the risk of placental malaria by 52 percent, the risk of low birth weight by 29 percent, and the risk of anemia by 10 percent. The effect did not vary by sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance levels (range, 19 percent-26 percent).

Efficacy of IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was lower among women using insecticide-treated nets. Three trials compared 2-dose with monthly IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy. Among HIV-positive women in their first or second pregnancy, monthly IPT resulted in less placental malaria and higher birth weight over the range of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance tested (8 percent-39 percent). Among HIV-negative women, there was no conclusive additional effect of monthly dosing.

“The deleterious effects of malaria during pregnancy can be substantially reduced by using IPT in pregnant women. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is currently the only single-dose long-acting antimalarial drug that has ideal properties (low cost, documented safety, and ease of use) for use as an IPT during pregnancy. The current appraisal of available data on the efficacy of IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as a function of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment responses in children provides policy makers with a clearer understanding of the value of different IPT regimens with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy in the context of increasing sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine drug resistance,” the authors write.

“Reserving the use of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for IPT during pregnancy and for infants may reduce drug pressure and may prolong longevity of this valuable drug. Almost all countries in Africa are taking this course and have either implemented or are in the process of implementing the use of combination therapy for first-line treatment in the population, mostly with artemisinin-based [a type of antimalarial drug] combinations. This will also limit the options to monitor the degree of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance in treatment studies in children in vivo, and future studies that aim to determine the effect of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance on the efficacy of IPT with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy may need to rely on molecular markers.”

Source: JAMA and Archives Journals

Explore further: Research shows that bacteria survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than thought

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

First radar vision for Copernicus

6 minutes ago

Launched on 3 April, ESA's Sentinel-1A satellite has already delivered its first radar images of Earth. They offer a tantalising glimpse of the kind of operational imagery that this new mission will provide ...

New approach needed to deal with increased flood risk

22 minutes ago

Considering the impacts of climate change on flood risk may not be effective unless current risk is managed better, according to new research from the University of Bristol published today in the Journal ...

Robotics goes micro-scale

26 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

38 minutes ago

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Recommended for you

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

13 hours ago

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.

Researchers see hospitalization records as additional tool

13 hours ago

Comparing hospitalization records with data reported to local boards of health presents a more accurate way to monitor how well communities track disease outbreaks, according to a paper published April 16 in the journal PLOS ON ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Firm targets 3D printing synthetic tissues, organs

(Medical Xpress)—A University of Oxford spin-out, OxSyBio, will develop 3D printing techniques to produce tissue-like synthetic materials for wound healing and drug delivery. In the longer term the company ...

Survival hope for melanoma patients thanks to new vaccine

(Medical Xpress)—University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that a new trial vaccine offers the most promising treatment to date for melanoma that has spread, with increased patient survival rates and improved ability ...

New clinical trial launched for advance lung cancer

Cancer Research UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer to create a pioneering clinical trial for patients with advanced lung cancer – marking a new era of research into personalised medicines ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Robotics goes micro-scale

(Phys.org) —The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the ...