Aspirin may cut cancer deaths slightly

Jun 07, 2007

U.S. researchers say women who take aspirin may have a lower risk of dying from cancer and heart disease.

A report, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, looked at data from 22,500 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Iowa Women's Health Study, WebMD said Wednesday.

Compared with women who never used aspirin, aspirin users were 13 percent less likely to die of cancer, 25 percent less likely to die of heart disease and 18 percent less likely to die of any cause during the study, WebMD said.

While the study didn't directly test aspirin's ability to block cancer, researchers say aspirin may provide a modest edge against cancer, cancer deaths, and heart disease deaths.

Dr. Aditya Bardia of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues said non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with decreased risk, the Mayo Clinic said in a release.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Opdivo approval expanded to include lung cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Why your laptop battery won't kill you

2 hours ago

News on Tuesday that major U.S. airlines are no longer going to ship powerful lithium-ion batteries might lead some to fret about the safety of their personal electronic devices.

Visa, MasterCard moving into mobile pay in Africa

2 hours ago

Americans may just be getting used to mobile pay, but consumers in many African countries have been paying with their phones for years. Now payment processors Visa and MasterCard want to get a slice of that market, and are ...

Lightning plus volcanic ash make glass

2 hours ago

In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcan ...

Recommended for you

Opdivo approval expanded to include lung cancer

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of Opdivo (nivolumab) has been expanded to include advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the agency said Wednesday in a news release.

First-of-its kind reference on pelvic malignancies

6 hours ago

Loyola University Medical Center radiation oncologist William Small, Jr., MD, FACRO, FACR, FASTRO, is co-editor of Pelvic Malignancy and its Consequences, the first-of-its kind stand-alone reference on the subject.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.