Ferrari chocolate candy is recalled

Jun 07, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the recall of Ferrari Chocolates because of undeclared peanuts and possible fungi contamination.

The FDA said the candy, a product of China that was distributed by Tristar Food Wholesale of Jersey City, N.J., presents a serious or life-threatening health risk for people who have an allergic sensitivity to peanuts.

The FDA said the candy also contains excess amounts of aflatoxins -- by-products of certain fungi that can be potential carcinogens.

The recalled Ferrari Chocolates were distributed in 280-gram and 240-gram boxes in New York City and New Jersey.

Consumers can contact the company at 201-938-2590.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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