$6 million Alzheimer grant announced

Jun 04, 2007

The U.S. National Institutes of Health has awarded a $6 million grant for the continuation of a promising study into Alzheimer's disease treatments.

The grant was awarded University of Missouri-Columbia biochemistry Professors Grace Sun and Gary Weisman, who are entering the second phase of a project aimed at identifying the causes of Alzheimer's disease.

As many as 20 million people worldwide are affected by Alzheimer's disease, with those numbers likely to triple by 2050 as the population ages.

"In the past five years, we have started to understand how this disease works," Sun said. "With the new grant, we will be able to go forward and see if there are treatments that can modify the cellular response in the brain."

Findings from the research program have been published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation, the Journal of Neuroscience and the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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