The universe's primordial soup flowing at CERN

February 9, 2016
The universe's primordial soup flowing at CERN
The figure shows how a small, elongated drop of quark-gluon plasma is formed when two atomic nuclei hit each other a bit off center. The angular distribution of the emitted particles makes it possible to determine the properties of the quark-gluon plasma, including the viscosity. Credit: State University of New York

Researchers have recreated the universe's primordial soup in miniature format by colliding lead atoms with extremely high energy in the 27 km long particle accelerator, the LHC at CERN in Geneva. The primordial soup is a so-called quark-gluon plasma and researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute, among others, have measured its liquid properties with great accuracy at the LHC's top energy. The results have been submitted to Physical Review Letters.

A few billionths of a second after the Big Bang, the universe was made up of a kind of extremely hot and dense of the most fundamental particles, especially quarks and gluons. This state is called quark-gluon plasma. By colliding lead nuclei at a record-high energy of 5.02 TeV in the world's most powerful , the 27 km long Large Hadron Collider, LHC at CERN in Geneva, it has been possible to recreate this state in the ALICE experiment's detector and measure its properties.

"The analyses of the collisions make it possible, for the first time, to measure the precise characteristics of a quark-gluon plasma at the highest energy ever and to determine how it flows," explains You Zhou, who is a postdoc in the ALICE research group at the Niels Bohr Institute. You Zhou, together with a small, fast-working team of international collaboration partners, led the analysis of the new data and measured how the quark-gluon plasma flows and fluctuates after it is formed by the collisions between lead ions.

Advanced methods of measurement

The focus has been on the quark-gluon plasma's collective properties, which show that this state of matter behaves more like a liquid than a gas, even at the very highest energy densities. The new measurements, which uses new methods to study the correlation between many particles, make it possible to determine the viscosity of this exotic fluid with great precision.

You Zhou explains that the experimental method is very advanced and is based on the fact that when two spherical atomic nuclei are shot at each other and hit each other a bit off center, a quark-gluon is formed with a slightly elongated shape somewhat like an American football. This means that the pressure difference between the centre of this extremely hot 'droplet' and the surface varies along the different axes. The pressure differential drives the expansion and flow and consequently one can measure a characteristic variation in the number of particles produced in the collisions as a function of the angle.

Mapping the primordial soup

"It is remarkable that we are able to carry out such detailed measurements on a drop of 'early universe', that only has a radius of about one millionth of a billionth of a meter. The results are fully consistent with the physical laws of hydrodynamics, i.e. the theory of flowing liquids and it shows that the behaves like a fluid. It is however a very special liquid, as it does not consist of molecules like water, but of the quarks and gluons," explains Jens Jørgen Gaardhøje, professor and head of the ALICE group at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen.

Jens Jørgen Gaardhøje adds that they are now in the process of mapping this state with ever increasing precision—and even further back in time.

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Hyperfuzzy
5 / 5 (1) Feb 09, 2016
Could you explain those boundary conditions again.
bschott
not rated yet Feb 09, 2016
How long does it behave like a fluid for?
baudrunner
not rated yet Feb 09, 2016
I like this. The experiment demonstrates a refinement of the application of the particle accelerator beyond merely studying what happens when particles collide. This could lead to refined research in other areas, like studying what happens when synchrotron radiation is used in laser applications, for example. You might want to point that thing down, please...
vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (2) Feb 10, 2016
sub: Cause-effect- mistaken identities
Where is the Search ? Where lies origins- what use of misleads ??
Your info: New results about the primordial universe from CERN experiments
Mapping the primordial soup-It is remarkable that we are able to carry out such detailed measurements on a drop of 'early universe', that only has a radius of about one millionth of a billionth of a meter.

Steelwolf
not rated yet Feb 10, 2016
What is funny is that I just read an article where they were colliding gold nuclei and getting the chiral magnetic wave situation in the quark-gluon liquid. With the way that the charges are distributed within this liquid (which shows there MUST be a finer form of matter/energy than mere quarks and qluons, that they are composed of something MUCH smaller in order for them to, as a mass, exhibit a liquid nature) is also another fractal iteration of the Soliton Knot ( http://phys.org/n...eld.html , Watch the vid).

I admit to finding it extremely humorous that this particular pattern is showing up at multiple scales, up to galactic and even galactic cluster scale, we find the same processes happening. I agree with Spider Robinson: God is an Iron!
Hyperfuzzy
not rated yet Feb 10, 2016
Since this occupies space, has "mass", and is temporal, the primordial soup is defined with the wrong boundary conditions. Else the projected timing of this is just wrong. Note the expansion from a single point into the entire universe. Essentially, I'm saying as an experienced engineer, this makes no sense! Think! Expansion, volume, texture, "weight", something from nothing, ...

Who thinks this s#it is right?
baudrunner
not rated yet Feb 13, 2016
sub: Cause-effect- mistaken identities
Where is the Search ? Where lies origins- what use of misleads ??
Your info: New results about the primordial universe from CERN experiments
Mapping the primordial soup-It is remarkable that we are able to carry out such detailed measurements on a drop of 'early universe', that only has a radius of about one millionth of a billionth of a meter.
WTF! What a lot of blabber about nothing! What's your point?
baudrunner
not rated yet Feb 13, 2016
Who thinks this s#it is right?
Well, I do, for one, but I've studied EM inductive processes and the physics behind them, and this experiment does not strike me as being in the least counter-intuitive. The results are always open to further interpretation. For example, it might be that this is the way that virtual particles are created spontaneously in space. Something must stimulate their production.

For a brief moment, as a pre-quark-gluon mass of plasma, referring to that 'droplet' as an analogue of the "primordial soup" is not such a far-off description. It is up to the creative theoretical physicists to posit what it would be before that.
exequus
5 / 5 (1) Feb 13, 2016
Any truth to the rumor that the primordial soup tasted like onion soup? But then there are others who swear that it must have tasted like lentil soup.
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
Who thinks this s#it is right?
Well, I do, for one, but I've studied EM inductive processes and the physics behind them, and this experiment does not strike me as being in the least counter-intuitive. The results are always open to further interpretation. For example, it might be that this is the way that virtual particles are created spontaneously in space. Something must stimulate their production.

For a brief moment, as a pre-quark-gluon mass of plasma, referring to that 'droplet' as an analogue of the "primordial soup" is not such a far-off description. It is up to the creative theoretical physicists to posit what it would be before that.

OK meter stick passes by in 1 sec, its moving at a meter/sec. You run pass it and it takes 2 sec, so it moves at 0.5 Meter/sec. If it's a wavelet one meter long then its a space time wrinkle, get real!
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
A particle emits waves, we see a diffraction pattern after a slit, we send particles into the slit, we see a detraction pattern, Aha! We say, waves and particles have a duality. Idiots, its the same freaking experiment. The first one showed you that the particles don't even have to enter the slit. So you say, but I slowed it down and only sent one particles at a time. Idiot! What?
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
Looking at cosmic waves with a cloud chamber. We see a particle that moves exactly like an electron but backwards. Anti-matter! What, doesn't this prove that protons and electrons are the same but with different sign? Anti-charge? Idiots!

But wait, in a cloud chamber?
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
The standard model begins something like this: "What holds the nucleus together?" Answer: "I don't know, gluons!", Ha, ha, ha, ...

But the neutron breaks into an electron and a proton and a neutrino. Fact is, when is the neutron stable within any field? Go figure, you can figure it out on your calculator. Only thing, fix the radius and the mass. Try only charge and no other assumptions. "Oops", he says, "What about these universal constants?" Answer: "Yea, what about it?"
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
Oh, the neutrino? Check out the motion of the proton and electron as the neutron breaks apart. Come on, it doesn't just go quietly!
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
Primordial soup?

Yea!
Phys1
5 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2016
@HF
Did you ever show your contributions to a psychiatrist ?
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2016
@HF
Did you ever show your contributions to a psychiatrist ?

Yes, my wife, you? By the way she doesn't get it. Neither does any PhD. When at IBM I spoke to a theoretical physicist from Cornell, his reply, "There's not enough energy in it." Talking about gravity and the particles that make up a mass. I didn't get it. So just let it go. But you guys seem to eat this nonsense up. Maybe thinking for yourselves, but with what kind of attitude? Objective or subjective?
Phys1
5 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2016
Dear HF
I peaked at your posts and I did not understand a word.
Rationale:
It would be unethical to blacklist you if you make sense
so I have to check occasionally.
Captain Stumpy
3 / 5 (4) Feb 15, 2016
By the way she doesn't get it. Neither does any PhD
and that doesn't scream something to you?

https://en.wikipe...8film%29

perhaps you need a second opinion (from a psychiatrist that doesn't have a personal vested interest or bias)?
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2016
By the way she doesn't get it. Neither does any PhD
and that doesn't scream something to you?

https://en.wikipe...8film%29

perhaps you need a second opinion (from a psychiatrist that doesn't have a personal vested interest or bias)?

Kidding right? Occam's razor?
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (1) Feb 15, 2016
By the way she doesn't get it. Neither does any PhD
and that doesn't scream something to you?

https://en.wikipe...8film%29

perhaps you need a second opinion (from a psychiatrist that doesn't have a personal vested interest or bias)?

Kidding right? Occam's razor?

Think the PhD response meant the lack of energy to show the relationship of protons and electrons of a mass as to how it effects gravity. Not sure you must have a syndrome i order to think clearly. I possibly the other way round.
Phys1
5 / 5 (1) Feb 15, 2016
@HF
Careful, Occam's razor is a sharp double edged sword !
Hyperfuzzy
1 / 5 (1) Feb 15, 2016
@HF
Careful, Occam's razor is a sharp double edged sword !


Can't figure why all the support for something that's so hard to show empirically or mathematically. Every proof does nothing to show why i'm wrong and the status quo is correct. It's like saying something anti-religious is sacrilege, with no existence proof of the later! Other words a sin to differ. Oh, we are still fighting this one, also. There's something amiss. So even if you could create a theory that's correct by changing the shape of space and time within a mathematically continuous space it would still be able to transpose to a euclidean space. It's conceptual and works for all my engineering analysis, even gravity, ... https://onedrive....le%2cpdf

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